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The Manosphere: Pathways and Patterns of Participation

The Manosphere: Pathways and Patterns of Participation

About the Project

This project builds on the fast-growing body of research exploring the use of the internet by male supremacist groups across the political spectrum, extending it significantly through the conduct of empirical research and examination of important, overlooked dimensions of the problem. The research shows four innovations to understand pathways to and patterns of participation in the mansophere: 1) Investigating the role of masculinities in pathways to and patterns of participation in online anti-women movements; 2) exploring how emotion and its intersection with technology shape patterns of participation; 3) identifying how access to anonymity and other technological affordances of social media including upvoting, recommender functions and echo chambers shape patterns of participation in online anti-women movements; and 4) applying new methods for understanding how women and girls are targeted and silenced in online environments.

The project will advance sociological scholarship on the endemic problem of anti-women online movements in Australia, Ireland and internationally. The project will directly address questions why some men are attracted to anti-women online movements and their patterns of participation within them. This will expand our understanding of the role of masculinities and relationship between emotion, technology and pathways to participation in anti-women movements and the relationship between anonymity and online violence against women. Moving beyond discursive analysis of the content of online forums, the theoretical and analytical innovations resulting a synthesis of these.

Project Team

A/Prof Joshua Roose (Deakin) (Lead Chief Investigator)

A/Prof Michael Flood (QUT) (ARC Chief Investigator)

A/Prof Debbie Ging (DCU) (Partner Investigator)

Dr Vivian Gerrand (Deakin University) (Post-Doctoral Research Fellow)

Project Funding

This project is funded by the Australian Research Council (ARC).

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